Numero di utenti collegati: 9242

libri, guide,
letteratura di viaggio

07/12/2022 02:12:42

benvenuto nella libreria on-line di

.:: e-Commerce by Marco Vasta, solidarietà con l'Himàlaya :::.

The Universe in a Single Atom

The Convergence of Science and Spirituality

Tensing Gyatso, XIV Dalai Lama


Editeur - Casa editrice

Random House

Religione
Buddhismo
Vajrayana

Anno - Date de Parution

2005

Pagine - Pages

224

Titolo originale

The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality

Lingua originale

Lingua - language - langue

eng


The Universe in a Single Atom The Universe in a Single Atom  

Gallileo, Copernicus, Newton, Niels Bohr, Einstein. Their insights shook our perception of who we are and where we stand in the world and in their wake have left an uneasy co-existence: science vs. religion, faith vs. empirical enquiry. Which is the keeper of truth? Which is the true path to understanding reality?

After forty years of study with some of the greatest scientific minds as well as a lifetime of meditative, spiritual and philosophical study, the Dalai Lama presents a brilliant analysis of why both disciplines must be pursued in order to arrive at a complete picture of the truth. Science shows us ways of interpreting the physical world, while spirituality helps us cope with reality. But the extreme of either is impoverishing. The belief that all is reducible to matter and energy leaves out a huge range of human experience: emotions, yearnings, compassion, culture. At the same time, holding unexamined spiritual beliefs–beliefs that are contradicted by evidence, logic, and experience–can lock us into fundamentalist cages.

Through an examination of Darwinism and karma, quantum mechanics and philosophical insight into the nature of reality, neurobiology and the study of consciousness, the Dalai Lama draws significant parallels between contemplative and scientific examination of reality. “I believe that spirituality and science are complementary but different investigative approaches with the same goal of seeking the truth,” His Holiness writes. “In this, there is much each may learn from the other, and together they may contribute to expanding the horizon of human knowledge and wisdom.”

This breathtakingly personal examination is a tribute to the Dalai Lama’s teachers–both of science and spirituality. The legacy of this book is a vision of the world in which our different approaches to understanding ourselves, our universe and one another can be brought together in the service of humanity.

PRAISE



“The Dalai Lama lost spiritual leadership in his own country, but now exercises it around the world. Like all good teachers, he comes to learn. He found that what Buddhism lacked in his country was a fruitful interchange with reason and modern science. Here he fosters that exchange, at a time when some Christians have turned their backs on science and the Enlightenment. We are losing what he has gained.”
—Garry Wills, author of Why I Am a Catholic

“With disarming honesty, humility, and respect, His Holiness the Dalai Lama has explored the relationship between religion and science and suggested the way in which they can affirm and qualify each other’s insights. By juxtaposing traditional Buddhist teaching with the discoveries of modern physics and biology, he infuses the debate about such contentious issues as the origins of the universe, the nature of human consciousness, the evolution of species and genetic engineering with intimations of profound spirituality and shows how these questions can further our search for ultimate meaning. But above all, his gentle but insistent call for compassion is desperately needed in our torn and conflicted world.”
—Karen Armstrong, author of A HIstory of God and The Spiral Staircase



ABOUT THIS AUTHOR


Tenzin Gyatzo, His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, is the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and is both the temporal and spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. The Dalai Lama travels the world speaking on peace and interreligious understanding, giving Buddhist teachings, and meeting with political leaders as he works tirelessly on behalf of the Tibetan people. He resides in Dharamsala, India, and is the head of the Tibetan government-in-exile.

 

Consulta anche: Traduzione in lingua italiana con scheda


Recensione in lingua italiana

MYT 18 september 2005
'The Universe in a Single Atom': Reason and Faith
By GEORGE JOHNSON
Published: September 18, 2005

It's been a brutal season in the culture wars with both the White House and a prominent Catholic cardinal speaking out in favor of creationist superstition, while public schools and even natural history museums shy away from teaching evolutionary science. When I picked up the Dalai Lama's new book, "The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality," I feared that His Holiness, the leader of Tibetan Buddhism, was adding to the confusion between reason and faith.

It was his subtitle that bothered me. Spirituality is about the ineffable and unprovable, science about the physical world of demonstrable fact. Faced with two such contradictory enterprises, divergence would be a better goal. The last thing anyone needs is another attempt to contort biology to fit a particular religion or to use cosmology to prove the existence of God.

But this book offers something wiser: a compassionate and clearheaded account by a religious leader who not only respects science but, for the most part, embraces it. "If scientific analysis were conclusively to demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, then we must accept the findings of science and abandon those claims," he writes. No one who wants to understand the world "can ignore the basic insights of theories as key as evolution, relativity and quantum mechanics."

That is an extraordinary concession compared with the Christian apologias that dominate conferences devoted to reconciling science and religion. The "dialogues" implicitly begin with nonnegotiables - "Given that Jesus died on the cross and was bodily resurrected into heaven. . ." - then seek scientific justification for what is already assumed to be true.

The story of how someone so open-minded became the Tibetan Buddhist equivalent of the pope reads like a fairy tale. When the 13th Dalai Lama died in 1933 he was facing northeast, so a spiritual search team was sent in that direction to find his reincarnation. The quest narrowed further when a lama had a vision pointing to a certain house with unusual gutters. Inside a boy called out to the visitors, who showed him some toys and relics that would have belonged to him in his previous life. "It is mine!" he exclaimed, like any acquisitive 2-year-old, and so his reign began.

Once installed in Lhasa, the new Dalai Lama happened upon another of his forerunner's possessions, a collapsible brass telescope. When he focused it one evening on what Tibetans call "the rabbit on the moon," he saw that it consisted of shadows cast by craters. Although he knew nothing yet about astronomy, he inferred that the moon, like the earth, must be lighted by the sun. He had experienced the thrill of discovery.

Before long he was dismantling and repairing clocks and watches and tinkering with car engines and an old movie projector. As he grew older and traveled the world, he was as keen to meet with scientists and philosophers - David Bohm, Carl von Weizsäcker, Karl Popper - as with religious and political leaders. More recently his "Mind and Life" conferences have brought physicists, cosmologists, biologists and psychologists to Dharamsala, India, where he now lives in exile from the Chinese occupation of Tibet. He and his guests discuss things like the neuroscientific basis of Buddhist meditation and the similarities between Eastern concepts like the "philosophy of emptiness" and modern field theory. In "The Universe in a Single Atom" he tells how he walked the mountains around his home trying to persuade hermits to contribute to scientific understanding by meditating with electrodes on their heads.

But when it comes to questions about life and its origins, this would-be man of science begins to waver. Though he professes to accept evolutionary theory, he recoils at one of its most basic tenets: that the mutations that provide the raw material for natural selection occur at random. Look deeply enough, he suggests, and the randomness will turn out to be complexity in disguise - "hidden causality," the Buddha's smile. There you have it, Eastern religion's version of intelligent design. He also opposes physical explanations for consciousness, invoking instead the existence of some kind of irreducible mind stuff, an idea rejected long ago by mainstream science. Some members of the Society for Neuroscience are understandably uneasy that he has been invited to give a lecture at their annual meeting this November. In a petition, they protested that his topic, the science of meditation, is known for "hyperbolic claims, limited research and compromised scientific rigor."

There may be a political subtext to the controversy. According to an article in Nature, many of the petitioners are Chinese. But however mixed their motivation, they make a basic philosophical point. All religion is rooted in a belief in the supernatural. Inviting a holy man to address a scientific conference may be leaving the back door ajar for ghosts.

George Johnson, the author of "Miss Leavitt's Stars," was a recipient this year of a Templeton-Cambridge Journalism Fellowship in Science and Religion.


Biografia


Tratto da www.italiatibet.org traduzione di Vicky Sevegnani.


 



Sua Santità Tenzin Gyatso, 14° Dalai Lama del Tibet, è il capo temporale e spirituale del popolo tibetano. Nato con il nome di Lhamo Dhondrub il 6 luglio 1935 in un piccolo villaggio chiamato Taktser, nel nordest del Tibet, da una famiglia di contadini, all’età di due anni fu riconosciuto come la reincarnazione del suo predecessore, il 13° Dalai Lama e, secondo la tradizione buddista tibetana, come reincarnazione di Avalokitesvara, il Buddha della Compassione che scelse di tornare sulla terra per servire la gente.





La ricerca della reincarnazione



Quando il 13° Dalai Lama morì, nel 1935, il compito che il Governo Tibetano dovette affrontare non fu quello della semplice nomina di un successore ma la ricerca del bambino in cui il “Buddha della Compassione si fosse reincarnato.
Il Reggente si recò al lago sacro di Lhamo Lhatso a Chokhorgyal, circa 90 miglia a sud-est della capitale, Lhasa. Da secoli i tibetani, quando dovevano prendere decisioni importanti per il loro futuro, osservavano le acque di questo lago la cui superficie rifletteva immagini significative e forniva utili indicazioni.
Il Reggente vide tre lettere dell’alfabeto tibetano, Ah, Ka e Ma, accompagnate dall’immagine di un monastero dal tetto di giada verde e oro e di una casa con tegole turchesi. Nel 1937 alti lama e dignitari, messi al corrente della visione, furono inviati in tutte le regioni dell’altopiano alla ricerca del luogo che il Reggente aveva visto nelle acque. Il gruppo di ricerca che si indirizzò verso est era guidato dal Lama Kewtsang Rinpoche, appartenente al monastero di Sera.



Quando arrivarono in Amdo, trovarono un luogo che corrispondeva alla descrizione della visione segreta. Il gruppo si recò verso la casa con le tegole turchesi. Kewtsang Rinpoche indossava le vesti di un servitore mentre l’effettivo servitore, Lobsang Tsewang, vestiva quelle del capo delegazione. Rinpoche aveva con sé un rosario appartenuto al 13° Dalai Lama: il bambino che era nella casa lo riconobbe e chiese che gli fosse dato. Kewtsang Rinpoche promise che glielo avrebbe consegnato se avesse riconosciuto chi fosse. Il piccolo rispose “Sera aga” che, nel dialetto locale, significa “un lama di Sera”. Allora Rinpoche gli chiese quale dei due arrivati fosse il capo della delegazione e il bambino disse correttamente il nome del lama; conosceva inoltre anche il nome del vero servitore. A questa, seguì un’altra serie di prove tra cui il riconoscimento di una serie di oggetti appartenuti al 13° Dalai Lama.



Il positivo esito delle prove fornì la certezza che la reincarnazione era stata trovata e fu avvalorata dal significato delle tre lettere che erano state viste nel lago di Lhamo Lhatso: Ah per Amdo, il nome della provincia; Ka per Kumbum, uno dei più grandi monasteri nelle vicinanze e le due lettere Ka e Ma per il monastero di Karma Rolpai Dorje, il monastero dal tetto verde e oro sulla montagna sopra il villaggio. La cerimonia di investitura ebbe luogo il 22 febbraio 1940 a Lhasa, capitale del Tibet.



In qualità di Dalai Lama, Lhamo Dhondrub fu ribattezzato con i nomi di Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso (Signore Santo, Mite Splendore, Compassionevole, Difensore della Fede, Oceano di Saggezza). I Tibetani solitamente si riferiscono a Sua Santità come Yeshe Norbu, la Gemma [che esaudisce i desideri] o semplicemente come Kundun, la Presenza.



L’educazione in Tibet



Il Dalai Lama iniziò la sua educazione all’età di sei anni e conseguì il diploma di Geshe Lharampa (o Dottorato in Filosofia Buddista) all’età di 25 anni, nel 1959. A 24 anni, sostenne gli esami preliminari in ciascuna delle tre università monastiche di Drepung, Sera e Ganden. L’esame finale ebbe luogo nel Jokhang, a Lhasa, durante la festività del Monlam che si svolge ogni anno durante il primo mese del calendario Tibetano.




L’assunzione delle responsabilità di governo


Il 17 Novembre 1950, dopo l’invasione del Tibet da parte di 80.000 soldati dell’Esercito di Liberazione Popolare, fu chiesto a Sua Santità di assumere i pieni poteri politici come capo di Stato e di Governo. Nel 1954 si recò a Pechino per avviare un dialogo pacifico con Mao Tse-Tung e altri leader cinesi, fra i quali Chou En-Lai e Deng Xiaoping. Nel 1956, durante una visita in India in occasione del 2.500° anniversario del Buddha Jayanti, ebbe una serie di incontri con il Primo Ministro Nehru e con il Premier Chou En-Lai in cui fu discusso il progressivo deterioramento della situazione all’interno del Tibet.
I suoi tentativi di soluzione pacifica del conflitto Sino-Tibetano furono vanificati dalla spietata politica perseguita da Pechino nel Tibet Orientale, politica che scatenò la sollevazione popolare e la resistenza. La protesta si diffuse nelle altre regioni del paese. Il 10 marzo 1959 nella capitale, Lhasa, esplose la più grande dimostrazione della storia tibetana: il popolo chiese alla Cina di lasciare il Tibet e riaffermò l’indipendenza del paese. La sollevazione nazionale tibetana fu brutalmente repressa dall’esercito cinese.
Il Dalai Lama fuggì in India dove ottenne asilo politico. Circa 80.000 tibetani lo seguirono e, attualmente, i profughi in India sono più di 120.000. Dal 1960, il Dalai Lama risiede a Dharamsala, una cittadina situata nello stato indiano dell’Himachal Pradesh, conosciuta anche come “la piccola Lhasa” e sede del Governo Tibetano in esilio.
Nei primi anni dell’esilio, Sua Santità si appellò alle Nazioni Unite per una soluzione della questione tibetana. L’assemblea Generale, rispettivamente nel 1959, 1961 e 1965, adottò tre risoluzioni nelle quali si esortava la Cina a rispettare i diritti umani dei tibetani e la loro aspirazione all’autodeterminazione.
Con la costituzione del Governo Tibetano in esilio, il Dalai Lama comprese che il suo primo obbiettivo doveva essere la preservazione della comunità tibetana e della sua cultura. I rifugiati tibetani furono inseriti in insediamenti agricoli. Fu sostenuto lo sviluppo economico e fu organizzato un sistema scolastico basato sull’insegnamento della cultura tibetana affinché i figli dei rifugiati potessero acquisire la piena conoscenza della loro lingua, storia, cultura e religione. Nel 1959 fu creato l’Istituto Tibetano delle Arti e lo Spettacolo e l’Istituto Centrale di Studi Tibetani Superiori divenne una Università per i tibetani in India. Allo scopo di preservare il vasto corpo degli insegnamenti del Buddismo tibetano, essenza del sistema di vita del popolo del Tibet, furono rifondati nell’esilio oltre 200 monasteri.
Nel 1963, Sua Santità promulgò una costituzione democratica, che servisse da modello per un futuro Tibet libero, basata sia sui principi del Buddismo sia sulla Dichiarazione Universale dei Diritti Umani. Oggi i membri del parlamento sono eletti direttamente del popolo che, dalla primavera 2001, elegge direttamente anche il Kalon Tripa, o Primo Ministro, del governo tibetano. Il Primo Ministro, a sua volta, designa i componenti del proprio governo. Sua Santità ha continuamente sottolineato la necessità di democratizzare l’amministrazione tibetana e ha pubblicamente dichiarato che quando il Tibet avrà ottenuto l’indipendenza, non manterrà alcuna carica politica.
Nel 1987 a Washington, in occasione della riunione del Comitato del Congresso per i Diritti Umani, il Dalai Lama propose un Piano di Pace in Cinque Punti come un primo passo verso la soluzione del futuro status del Tibet. Questo piano chiedeva la trasformazione del Tibet in una zona di pace, la fine dei massicci trasferimenti di popolazione di etnia cinese in Tibet, il ripristino dei fondamentali diritti umani e delle libertà democratiche, l’abbandono da parte della Cina dell’utilizzo del territorio tibetano per la produzione di armi nucleari e lo scarico di rifiuti radioattivi e, infine, auspicava l’avvio di “seri negoziati” sul futuro del Tibet.
A Strasburgo, in Francia, il 15 giugno 1988, il Dalai Lama elaborò il
Piano di Pace in Cinque Punti
proponendo la creazione di un Tibet democratico ed autonomo, “all’interno della Repubblica Popolare Cinese.”
Il 9 ottobre 1991, durante un discorso tenuto alla Yale University negli Stati Uniti, Sua Santità disse che desiderava visitare il Tibet personalmente per valutare la situazione politica. Disse: “Temo che una situazione così esplosiva possa portare alla violenza. Voglio fare del mio meglio per impedirlo … Il mio viaggio dovrebbe costituire una nuova opportunità per promuovere la comprensione e creare le basi per una soluzione negoziale.”
Dopo quasi dieci anni di assenza di qualsiasi contatto formale tra Cina e Governo Tibetano in Esilio, nel settembre 2002 e nel giugno 2003 due delegazioni tibetane hanno potuto recarsi un visita in Cina e Tibet. Secondo Dharamsala, si è trattato di incontri preparatori ad un eventuale, futuro negoziato, miranti a creare le indispensabili premesse di distensione e fiducia.





I contatti con l’Occidente


A partire dal 1967, Sua Santità ha intrapreso una serie di viaggi che lo hanno portato in circa 46 nazioni. Nell’autunno del 1991, ha visitato gli Stati Baltici su invito del Presidente Vytautas Landsbergis ed è stato il primo leader straniero a tenere un discorso davanti al Parlamento Lituano. Il Dalai Lama ha incontrato Papa Paolo VI in Vaticano nel 1973. Durante una conferenza stampa a Roma, nel 1980, ha espresso le sue speranze alla vigilia dell’incontro con Giovanni Paolo II: “Viviamo in un periodo di grande crisi, un periodo in cui il mondo è scosso da turbolenti sviluppi . Non è possibile trovare la pace dell’anima senza la sicurezza e l’armonia fra le genti. Per questo motivo aspetto con fede e speranza di incontrare il Santo Padre; per avere uno scambio di idee e sentimenti e per raccogliere i suoi suggerimenti, per aprire la strada ad una progressiva pacificazione fra i popoli.”
Il Dalai Lama incontrò Papa Giovanni Paolo II in Vaticano nel 1980, 1982, 1986, 1988 e 1990. Nel 1981, Sua Santità incontrò a Londra l’Arcivescovo di Canterbury, dr. Robert Runcie e altri leader della Chiesa Anglicana. Ha incontrato inoltre i massimi rappresentanti della Chiesa Cattolica Romana e delle Comunità Ebraiche e ha tenuto un discorso durante un incontro interreligioso che si è tenuto in suo onore al Congresso Mondiale delle Religioni. Queste le sue parole: “Credo sempre che sia molto meglio avere una varietà di religioni e filosofie diverse piuttosto che una singola religione o una singola filosofia. E’ necessario a causa della diversa disposizione mentale di ciascun essere umano. Ogni religione ha le sue peculiari idee e pratiche: imparare a conoscerle può solo arricchire la fede di ciascuno.”






Premi e Riconoscimenti



Sin dalla sua prima visita in Occidente, all’inizio del 1973, numerose università ed istituzioni occidentali hanno conferito al Dalai Lama Premi per la Pace e Lauree ad Honorem, in segno di riconoscimento per gli approfonditi testi sulla filosofia buddista e per il ruolo svolto nella soluzione dei conflitti internazionali, nella questione dei diritti umani e in quella, a carattere globale, dei problemi ambientali. Nel 1989, nel proclamare l’assegnazione del premio Raoul Wallemberg per i Diritti Umani del Congresso, il deputato statunitense Tom Lantos disse: “La coraggiosa lotta di Sua Santità il Dalai Lama fa di lui un eminente sostenitore dei diritti umani e della pace nel mondo. I suoi continui sforzi per porre fine alle sofferenze del popolo Tibetano attraverso negoziati pacifici e la riconciliazione hanno richiesto un enorme coraggio e sacrificio.”



Il
Premio Nobel per la Pace



La decisione del Comitato Norvegese per il Premio Nobel di assegnare il Premio Nobel per la Pace 1989 a Sua Santità il Dalai Lama è stata accolta in tutto il mondo, unica eccezione la Cina, con applausi e consensi. L’annuncio del Comitato così recita: “Il Comitato vuole sottolineare il fatto che il Dalai Lama, nella sua lotta per la liberazione del Tibet, si è continuamente opposto all’uso della violenza. Ha appoggiato invece soluzioni pacifiche basate sulla tolleranza e sul reciproco rispetto con l’obiettivo di conservare l’eredità storica e culturale del suo popolo. Il Dalai Lama ha sviluppato la sua filosofia di pace sulla base di un grande rispetto per tutti gli esseri viventi e sull’idea di responsabilità universale che abbraccia tutto il genere umano così come la natura. E’ opinione del Comitato che il Dalai Lama abbia formulato proposte costruttive e lungimiranti per la soluzione dei conflitti internazionali, del problema dei diritti umani e dei problemi ambientali mondiali”.
Il 10 Dicembre 1989, Sua Santità accettò il premio a nome di tutti gli oppressi, di tutti coloro che lottano per la libertà e la pace nel mondo e a nome del popolo tibetano. Nel suo commento disse: “Questo premio costituisce un’ulteriore conferma delle nostre convinzioni: usando come sole arma la verità, il coraggio e la determinazione, il Tibet sarà liberato. La nostra lotta deve rimanere non violenta e libera dall’odio.” In quell’occasione, lanciò anche un messaggio di incoraggiamento al movimento democratico guidato dagli studenti cinesi. “Nel giugno di quest’anno, in Cina, il movimento popolare democratico è stato schiacciato da una forza brutale. Ma non credo che le dimostrazioni siano state vane perché lo spirito di libertà si è riacceso nel popolo cinese e la Cina non può rimanere estranea allo spirito di libertà che si va diffondendo in molte parti del mondo. I coraggiosi studenti e i loro sostenitori hanno mostrato ai leader cinesi e al mondo il volto umano di una grande nazione.”


 




Un semplice monaco buddista



Sua Santità dice spesso: “Sono un semplice monaco buddista, niente di più e niente di meno.”
Conduce la stessa vita dei monaci buddisti. Vive in una piccola casa a Dharamsala, si alza alle 4 del mattino per meditare, prosegue con un ininterrotto programma di incontri amministrativi, udienze private, insegnamenti religiosi e cerimonie. Prima di ritirarsi, conclude la sua giornata con altre preghiere. Quando vuole spiegare quali sono le sue più importanti fonti di ispirazione, spesso cita i suoi versi preferiti, tratti dagli scritti di Shantideva, un celebre santo buddista dell’VIII° secolo:



Finché esisterà lo spazio
E finché vi saranno esseri viventi,
Fino ad allora possa io rimanere
Per scacciare la sofferenza dal mondo

Informazioni tratte dal sito ufficiale del governo tibetano in esilio

Consulta anche: Traduzione in lingua italiana con scheda
Consulta anche: Biografia su Italia Tibet