-->

libri, guide,
letteratura di viaggio

13/11/2019 08:38:42

benvenuto nella libreria on-line di

.:: e-Commerce by Marco Vasta, solidarietà con l'Himàlaya :::.

Emozioni distruttive

Liberarsi dai tre veleni della mente: rabbia, desiderio e illusione
Tensing Gyatso, XIV Dalai Lama

Editeur - Casa editrice

Mondadori

Asia
Buddhismo
Vajrayana

Anno - Date de Parution

2003

Pagine - Pages

462

Titolo originale

Destructive Emotions

Lingua - language - langue

italiano

Edizione - Collana

Saggi

Traduttore

Cagliero Roberto

Curatore

Goleman Daniel

acquista in Italia tramite IBS
Emozioni distruttive. Liberarsi dai tre veleni della mente: rabbia, desiderio e illusione

acquista in Italia tramite IBS
Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama
Amazon.com (United States) - order this book
Destructive Emotions

Emozioni distruttive Emozioni distruttive  

Nel maggio del 2001, in un laboratorio dell'Università del Wisconsin, un monaco buddista venne sottoposto a un curioso esperimento: gli venne chiesto di raccogliersi in meditazione indossando una calotta collegata, attraverso un centinaio di sensori, a una macchina capace di registrare con precisione ogni minimo mutamento in corso nel suo cervello. Nel momento in cui il monaco diresse la sua compassione verso il bene di un'altra persona, i sensori registrarono un profondo cambiamento della sua condizione psichica: aveva raggiunto uno stato di pura gioia, di serena felicità.
Come racconta Daniel Goleman, psicologo noto in tutto il mondo grazie al successo di "Intelligenza emotiva", l'uomo aveva cancellato da sé ogni traccia dei "tre veleni" della mente, le tre 'emozioni distruttive': la rabbia, il desiderio e l'illusione.
Come è possibile per ciascuno di noi raggiungere un simile risultato? Per dare una risposta a questa e altre domande sul funzionamento della psiche umana si sono incontrati a Dharamsala, ai piedi dell'Himalaia, il Dalai Lama e un gruppo di psicologi, filosofi e neuroscienziati occidentali. Ne è nato - e Goleman lo ricostruisce e illustra in questo libro - un vivace dibattito tra chi possiede una millenaria pratica di introspezione e chi, avvalendosi dei più sofisticati strumenti offerti dalle scienze cognitive, riesce oggi a 'leggere nella mente'. E il modo più efficace per capire se sia possibile liberarsi dalle 'emozioni distruttive' è proprio mettere a confronto la tradizione Orientale con quella Occidentale.
Così dalle parole e dall'insegnamento del Dalai Lama apprendiamo che nessuno dei tre veleni è innato nella mente dell'uomo e che la cura dello spirito, nel solco della tradizione buddista, può aiutarci a trasformare emozioni negative in sentimenti positivi. Goleman, dal canto suo, ci mostra come alcune terapie psichiche e comportamentali, in particolar modo l'allenamento della mente attraverso le varie tecniche di meditazione, possano rimuovere le cause psicologiche e fisiche anche delle nostre peggiori pulsioni. "Emozioni distruttive" è uno sguardo carico di speranza sul lato oscuro della nostra mente. È l'incontro tra la saggezza della tradizione e le ultime acquisizioni della scienza moderna.

 


Recensione in altra lingua (English):

Destructive Emotions: How Can We Overcome Them? A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama forcefully puts to rest the misconception that the realms of science and spirituality are at odds. In this extraordinary book, Daniel Goleman presents dialogues between the Dalai Lama and a small group of eminent psychologists, neuroscientists, and philosophers that probe the challenging questions: Can the worlds of science and philosophy work together to recognize destructive emotions such as hatred, craving, and delusion? If so, can they transform those feelings for the ultimate improvement of humanity? As the Dalai Lama explains, "With the ever-growing impact of science on our lives, religion and spirituality have a greater role to play in reminding us of our humanity."

The book's subject marks the eighth round in a series of ongoing meetings of the Mind Life Institute. The varied perspectives of science, philosophy, and Eastern and Western thought beautifully illustrate the symbiosis among the views, which are readily accessible despite their complexity. Among the book's many strengths is its organization, which allows readers to enjoy the entire five-day seminar or choose sections that are most relevant to their interests, such as "Cultivating Emotional Balance," "The Neuroscience of Emotion," "Encouraging Compassion," or "The Scientific Study of Consciousness." But the real joy is in gaining an insider's view of these extraordinary minds at work, especially that of the Dalai Lama, whose curiosity, Socratic questioning, and humor ultimately serve as the linchpin for the book's soaring intellectual discussion. --Silvana Tropea


From Publishers Weekly
In May 2001, in a laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, a Tibetan Buddhist monk donned a cap studded with hundreds of sensors that were connected to a state-of-the-art EEG, a brain-scanning device capable of recording changes in his brain with speed and precision. When the monk began meditating in a way that was designed to generate compassion, the sensors registered a dramatic shift to a state of great joy. "The very act of concern for others' well-being, it seems, creates a greater state of well-being within oneself," writes bestselling author Goleman (Emotional Intelligence) in his extraordinary new work. Goleman offers this breakthrough as an appetizer to a feast. Readers will discover that it is just one of a myriad of creative and positive results that are continuing to flow from the Mind and Life dialogue that took place over five days in March 2000 between a group of leading Western scientists and philosophers and the Dalai Lama in his private quarters in Dharamsala, India. This eighth Mind and Life meeting is the seventh to be recorded in book form; Goleman's account is the most detailed and user-friendly to date. The timely theme of the dialogue was suggested by the Dalai Lama to Goleman, who took on the role of organizer and brought together some world-class researchers and thinkers, including psychologist Paul Ekman, philosopher Owen Flanagan, the late Francisco Varela and Buddhist photographer Matthieu Riccard. In a sense, the many extraordinary insights and findings that arise from the presentations and subsequent discussions are embodied by the Dalai Lama himself as he appears here. Far from the cuddly teddy bear the popular media sometimes makes him out to be, he emerges as a brilliant and exacting interrogator, a natural scientist, as well as a leader committed to finding a practical means to help society. Yet he also personally embodies the possibility of overcoming destructive emotions, of becoming resilient, compassionate and happy no matter what life brings. Covering the nature of destructive emotions, the neuroscience of emotion, the scientific study of consciousness and more, this essential volume offers a fascinating account of what can emerge when two profound systems for studying the mind and emotions, Western science and Buddhism, join forces. Goleman travels beyond the edge of the known, and the report he sends back is encouraging.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.


From Library Journal
Eradicating violence throughout the world is at the core of contemporary social thought and international justice. To that end, Goleman (psychology, Rutgers Univ.) shares relevant discourse from an international symposium between the Dalai Lama and experts in Eastern philosophy and Western science on the topic of emotions. The best of both schools of thought is brought together for the first time to establish a viable "mental gym" program aimed at developing the average person's range of healthy feelings. Training the brain to develop such feelings through the regular use of simple meditation techniques and conflict resolution skills causes our behavior to shift constructively toward other humans, the panel found. The flow of the discussion here operates at a deep level and is suitable primarily for psychology and psychiatry students. Notably, though, the contributors' wise decision to help people strengthen themselves emotionally not for moral reasons but for reasons of health and happiness will ultimately have mass appeal. It is also a practical step toward ending world violence. Recommended for academic libraries.
--Lisa Liquori, M.L.S., Syracuse, NY
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.


From Booklist
Instead of just transcribing and editing the March 2000 Mind and Life meeting involving the Dalai Lama, other Buddhist scholars, and experimental psychologists, Goleman, the meeting's scientific organizer, gives a narrative account of the five-day event. As a pair of Pulitzer Prize nominations for journalism and a succession of best-sellers beginning with Emotional Intelligence (1995) confirms, experimental psychologist Goleman is no mean writer, and this book is one of the most absorbing and, yes, entertaining reports of brainstorming in the public interest since Plato wrote up those symposia of Socrates'. The meeting's focus was on the emotions and the prospects for enabling people to defuse fear, anger, and other potentially destructive emotions before they trigger damaging behavior. The Dalai Lama's interest in these matters stemmed from the desire to find a secular means of achieving the compassionate and peaceable conduct of life that individual Tibetan Buddhist meditation practitioners have realized. Taking a page from TV, Goleman opens with a teaser--a description of later research inspired by the meeting--and then, a sketch of the Dalai Lama's lifelong scientific curiosity. The glorious bulk of the book traces the five days of presentations in the morning, informal and formal discussion in the early afternoon, and further presentation or discussion after tea break. The scientists are, except for one philosopher, cutting-edge neuroscientists and research psychologists, and the Buddhist participants are scientifically savvy, too, quite often Ph.D.'s themselves. A sublime intellectual experience with intriguing practical implications for a better world. Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved


Inside Flap Copy
*Why do seemingly rational, intelligent people commit acts of cruelty and violence?

*What are the root causes of destructive behavior?

*How can we control the emotions that drive these impulses?

*Can we learn to live at peace with ourselves and others?

Imagine sitting with the Dalai Lama in his private meeting room with a small group of world-class scientists and philosophers. The talk is lively and fascinating as these leading minds grapple with age-old questions of compelling contemporary urgency. Daniel Goleman, the internationally bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, provides the illuminating commentary--and reports on the breakthrough research this historic gathering inspired.

Destructive Emotions

Buddhist philosophy tells us that all personal unhappiness and interpersonal conflict lie in the ?three poisons?: craving, anger, and delusion. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication--which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. With new high-tech devices, scientists can peer inside the brain centers that calm the inner storms of rage and fear. They also can demonstrate that awareness-training strategies such as meditation strengthen emotional stability--and greatly enhance our positive moods.

The distinguished panel members report these recent findings and debate an exhilarating range of other topics: What role do destructive emotions play in human evolution? Are they ?hardwired? in our bodies? Are they universal, or does culture determine how we feel? How can we nurture the compassion that is also our birthright? We learn how practices that reduce negativity have also been shown to bolster the immune system. Here, too, is an enlightened proposal for a school-based program of social and emotional learning that can help our children increase self-awareness, manage their anger, and become more empathetic.

Throughout, these provocative ideas are brought to life by the play of personalities,
by the Dalai Lama?s probing questions, and by his surprising sense of humor. Although
there are no easy answers, the dialogues, which are part of a series sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute, chart an ultimately hopeful course. They are sure to spark discussion among educators, religious and political leaders, parents--and all people who seek peace for themselves and the world.


The Mind and Life Institute sponsors cross-cultural dialogues that bring together the Dalai Lama and other Buddhist scholars with Western scientists and philosophers. Mind and Life VIII, on which this book is based, took place in Dharamsala, India, in March 2000.


About the Author
Daniel Goleman, Ph.D., is the author of the worldwide bestsellers Emotional Intelligence and Working with Emotional Intelligence, and is co-author of Primal Leadership. Nominated twice for the Pulitzer Prize for his journalistic work covering the brain and behavioral sciences published in The New York Times, he is currently co-chair of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence at Rutgers University and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Book Description
*Why do seemingly rational, intelligent people commit acts of cruelty and violence?

*What are the root causes of destructive behavior?

*How can we control the emotions that drive these impulses?

*Can we learn to live at peace with ourselves and others?

Imagine sitting with the Dalai Lama in his private meeting room with a small group of world-class scientists and philosophers. The talk is lively and fascinating as these leading minds grapple with age-old questions of compelling contemporary urgency. Daniel Goleman, the internationally bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence, provides the illuminating commentary--and reports on the breakthrough research this historic gathering inspired.

Destructive Emotions

Buddhist philosophy tells us that all personal unhappiness and interpersonal conflict lie in the gthree poisonsh: craving, anger, and delusion. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication--which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. With new high-tech devices, scientists can peer inside the brain centers that calm the inner storms of rage and fear. They also can demonstrate that awareness-training strategies such as meditation strengthen emotional stability--and greatly enhance our positive moods.

The distinguished panel members report these recent findings and debate an exhilarating range of other topics: What role do destructive emotions play in human evolution? Are they ghardwiredh in our bodies? Are they universal, or does culture determine how we feel? How can we nurture the compassion that is also our birthright? We learn how practices that reduce negativity have also been shown to bolster the immune system. Here, too, is an enlightened proposal for a school-based program of social and emotional learning that can help our children increase self-awareness, manage their anger, and become more empathetic.



Biografia


Tratto da www.italiatibet.org traduzione di Vicky Sevegnani.


 



Sua Santità Tenzin Gyatso, 14° Dalai Lama del Tibet, è il capo temporale e spirituale del popolo tibetano. Nato con il nome di Lhamo Dhondrub il 6 luglio 1935 in un piccolo villaggio chiamato Taktser, nel nordest del Tibet, da una famiglia di contadini, all’età di due anni fu riconosciuto come la reincarnazione del suo predecessore, il 13° Dalai Lama e, secondo la tradizione buddista tibetana, come reincarnazione di Avalokitesvara, il Buddha della Compassione che scelse di tornare sulla terra per servire la gente.





La ricerca della reincarnazione



Quando il 13° Dalai Lama morì, nel 1935, il compito che il Governo Tibetano dovette affrontare non fu quello della semplice nomina di un successore ma la ricerca del bambino in cui il “Buddha della Compassione si fosse reincarnato.
Il Reggente si recò al lago sacro di Lhamo Lhatso a Chokhorgyal, circa 90 miglia a sud-est della capitale, Lhasa. Da secoli i tibetani, quando dovevano prendere decisioni importanti per il loro futuro, osservavano le acque di questo lago la cui superficie rifletteva immagini significative e forniva utili indicazioni.
Il Reggente vide tre lettere dell’alfabeto tibetano, Ah, Ka e Ma, accompagnate dall’immagine di un monastero dal tetto di giada verde e oro e di una casa con tegole turchesi. Nel 1937 alti lama e dignitari, messi al corrente della visione, furono inviati in tutte le regioni dell’altopiano alla ricerca del luogo che il Reggente aveva visto nelle acque. Il gruppo di ricerca che si indirizzò verso est era guidato dal Lama Kewtsang Rinpoche, appartenente al monastero di Sera.



Quando arrivarono in Amdo, trovarono un luogo che corrispondeva alla descrizione della visione segreta. Il gruppo si recò verso la casa con le tegole turchesi. Kewtsang Rinpoche indossava le vesti di un servitore mentre l’effettivo servitore, Lobsang Tsewang, vestiva quelle del capo delegazione. Rinpoche aveva con sé un rosario appartenuto al 13° Dalai Lama: il bambino che era nella casa lo riconobbe e chiese che gli fosse dato. Kewtsang Rinpoche promise che glielo avrebbe consegnato se avesse riconosciuto chi fosse. Il piccolo rispose “Sera aga” che, nel dialetto locale, significa “un lama di Sera”. Allora Rinpoche gli chiese quale dei due arrivati fosse il capo della delegazione e il bambino disse correttamente il nome del lama; conosceva inoltre anche il nome del vero servitore. A questa, seguì un’altra serie di prove tra cui il riconoscimento di una serie di oggetti appartenuti al 13° Dalai Lama.



Il positivo esito delle prove fornì la certezza che la reincarnazione era stata trovata e fu avvalorata dal significato delle tre lettere che erano state viste nel lago di Lhamo Lhatso: Ah per Amdo, il nome della provincia; Ka per Kumbum, uno dei più grandi monasteri nelle vicinanze e le due lettere Ka e Ma per il monastero di Karma Rolpai Dorje, il monastero dal tetto verde e oro sulla montagna sopra il villaggio. La cerimonia di investitura ebbe luogo il 22 febbraio 1940 a Lhasa, capitale del Tibet.



In qualità di Dalai Lama, Lhamo Dhondrub fu ribattezzato con i nomi di Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso (Signore Santo, Mite Splendore, Compassionevole, Difensore della Fede, Oceano di Saggezza). I Tibetani solitamente si riferiscono a Sua Santità come Yeshe Norbu, la Gemma [che esaudisce i desideri] o semplicemente come Kundun, la Presenza.



L’educazione in Tibet



Il Dalai Lama iniziò la sua educazione all’età di sei anni e conseguì il diploma di Geshe Lharampa (o Dottorato in Filosofia Buddista) all’età di 25 anni, nel 1959. A 24 anni, sostenne gli esami preliminari in ciascuna delle tre università monastiche di Drepung, Sera e Ganden. L’esame finale ebbe luogo nel Jokhang, a Lhasa, durante la festività del Monlam che si svolge ogni anno durante il primo mese del calendario Tibetano.




L’assunzione delle responsabilità di governo


Il 17 Novembre 1950, dopo l’invasione del Tibet da parte di 80.000 soldati dell’Esercito di Liberazione Popolare, fu chiesto a Sua Santità di assumere i pieni poteri politici come capo di Stato e di Governo. Nel 1954 si recò a Pechino per avviare un dialogo pacifico con Mao Tse-Tung e altri leader cinesi, fra i quali Chou En-Lai e Deng Xiaoping. Nel 1956, durante una visita in India in occasione del 2.500° anniversario del Buddha Jayanti, ebbe una serie di incontri con il Primo Ministro Nehru e con il Premier Chou En-Lai in cui fu discusso il progressivo deterioramento della situazione all’interno del Tibet.
I suoi tentativi di soluzione pacifica del conflitto Sino-Tibetano furono vanificati dalla spietata politica perseguita da Pechino nel Tibet Orientale, politica che scatenò la sollevazione popolare e la resistenza. La protesta si diffuse nelle altre regioni del paese. Il 10 marzo 1959 nella capitale, Lhasa, esplose la più grande dimostrazione della storia tibetana: il popolo chiese alla Cina di lasciare il Tibet e riaffermò l’indipendenza del paese. La sollevazione nazionale tibetana fu brutalmente repressa dall’esercito cinese.
Il Dalai Lama fuggì in India dove ottenne asilo politico. Circa 80.000 tibetani lo seguirono e, attualmente, i profughi in India sono più di 120.000. Dal 1960, il Dalai Lama risiede a Dharamsala, una cittadina situata nello stato indiano dell’Himachal Pradesh, conosciuta anche come “la piccola Lhasa” e sede del Governo Tibetano in esilio.
Nei primi anni dell’esilio, Sua Santità si appellò alle Nazioni Unite per una soluzione della questione tibetana. L’assemblea Generale, rispettivamente nel 1959, 1961 e 1965, adottò tre risoluzioni nelle quali si esortava la Cina a rispettare i diritti umani dei tibetani e la loro aspirazione all’autodeterminazione.
Con la costituzione del Governo Tibetano in esilio, il Dalai Lama comprese che il suo primo obbiettivo doveva essere la preservazione della comunità tibetana e della sua cultura. I rifugiati tibetani furono inseriti in insediamenti agricoli. Fu sostenuto lo sviluppo economico e fu organizzato un sistema scolastico basato sull’insegnamento della cultura tibetana affinché i figli dei rifugiati potessero acquisire la piena conoscenza della loro lingua, storia, cultura e religione. Nel 1959 fu creato l’Istituto Tibetano delle Arti e lo Spettacolo e l’Istituto Centrale di Studi Tibetani Superiori divenne una Università per i tibetani in India. Allo scopo di preservare il vasto corpo degli insegnamenti del Buddismo tibetano, essenza del sistema di vita del popolo del Tibet, furono rifondati nell’esilio oltre 200 monasteri.
Nel 1963, Sua Santità promulgò una costituzione democratica, che servisse da modello per un futuro Tibet libero, basata sia sui principi del Buddismo sia sulla Dichiarazione Universale dei Diritti Umani. Oggi i membri del parlamento sono eletti direttamente del popolo che, dalla primavera 2001, elegge direttamente anche il Kalon Tripa, o Primo Ministro, del governo tibetano. Il Primo Ministro, a sua volta, designa i componenti del proprio governo. Sua Santità ha continuamente sottolineato la necessità di democratizzare l’amministrazione tibetana e ha pubblicamente dichiarato che quando il Tibet avrà ottenuto l’indipendenza, non manterrà alcuna carica politica.
Nel 1987 a Washington, in occasione della riunione del Comitato del Congresso per i Diritti Umani, il Dalai Lama propose un Piano di Pace in Cinque Punti come un primo passo verso la soluzione del futuro status del Tibet. Questo piano chiedeva la trasformazione del Tibet in una zona di pace, la fine dei massicci trasferimenti di popolazione di etnia cinese in Tibet, il ripristino dei fondamentali diritti umani e delle libertà democratiche, l’abbandono da parte della Cina dell’utilizzo del territorio tibetano per la produzione di armi nucleari e lo scarico di rifiuti radioattivi e, infine, auspicava l’avvio di “seri negoziati” sul futuro del Tibet.
A Strasburgo, in Francia, il 15 giugno 1988, il Dalai Lama elaborò il
Piano di Pace in Cinque Punti
proponendo la creazione di un Tibet democratico ed autonomo, “all’interno della Repubblica Popolare Cinese.”
Il 9 ottobre 1991, durante un discorso tenuto alla Yale University negli Stati Uniti, Sua Santità disse che desiderava visitare il Tibet personalmente per valutare la situazione politica. Disse: “Temo che una situazione così esplosiva possa portare alla violenza. Voglio fare del mio meglio per impedirlo … Il mio viaggio dovrebbe costituire una nuova opportunità per promuovere la comprensione e creare le basi per una soluzione negoziale.”
Dopo quasi dieci anni di assenza di qualsiasi contatto formale tra Cina e Governo Tibetano in Esilio, nel settembre 2002 e nel giugno 2003 due delegazioni tibetane hanno potuto recarsi un visita in Cina e Tibet. Secondo Dharamsala, si è trattato di incontri preparatori ad un eventuale, futuro negoziato, miranti a creare le indispensabili premesse di distensione e fiducia.





I contatti con l’Occidente


A partire dal 1967, Sua Santità ha intrapreso una serie di viaggi che lo hanno portato in circa 46 nazioni. Nell’autunno del 1991, ha visitato gli Stati Baltici su invito del Presidente Vytautas Landsbergis ed è stato il primo leader straniero a tenere un discorso davanti al Parlamento Lituano. Il Dalai Lama ha incontrato Papa Paolo VI in Vaticano nel 1973. Durante una conferenza stampa a Roma, nel 1980, ha espresso le sue speranze alla vigilia dell’incontro con Giovanni Paolo II: “Viviamo in un periodo di grande crisi, un periodo in cui il mondo è scosso da turbolenti sviluppi . Non è possibile trovare la pace dell’anima senza la sicurezza e l’armonia fra le genti. Per questo motivo aspetto con fede e speranza di incontrare il Santo Padre; per avere uno scambio di idee e sentimenti e per raccogliere i suoi suggerimenti, per aprire la strada ad una progressiva pacificazione fra i popoli.”
Il Dalai Lama incontrò Papa Giovanni Paolo II in Vaticano nel 1980, 1982, 1986, 1988 e 1990. Nel 1981, Sua Santità incontrò a Londra l’Arcivescovo di Canterbury, dr. Robert Runcie e altri leader della Chiesa Anglicana. Ha incontrato inoltre i massimi rappresentanti della Chiesa Cattolica Romana e delle Comunità Ebraiche e ha tenuto un discorso durante un incontro interreligioso che si è tenuto in suo onore al Congresso Mondiale delle Religioni. Queste le sue parole: “Credo sempre che sia molto meglio avere una varietà di religioni e filosofie diverse piuttosto che una singola religione o una singola filosofia. E’ necessario a causa della diversa disposizione mentale di ciascun essere umano. Ogni religione ha le sue peculiari idee e pratiche: imparare a conoscerle può solo arricchire la fede di ciascuno.”






Premi e Riconoscimenti



Sin dalla sua prima visita in Occidente, all’inizio del 1973, numerose università ed istituzioni occidentali hanno conferito al Dalai Lama Premi per la Pace e Lauree ad Honorem, in segno di riconoscimento per gli approfonditi testi sulla filosofia buddista e per il ruolo svolto nella soluzione dei conflitti internazionali, nella questione dei diritti umani e in quella, a carattere globale, dei problemi ambientali. Nel 1989, nel proclamare l’assegnazione del premio Raoul Wallemberg per i Diritti Umani del Congresso, il deputato statunitense Tom Lantos disse: “La coraggiosa lotta di Sua Santità il Dalai Lama fa di lui un eminente sostenitore dei diritti umani e della pace nel mondo. I suoi continui sforzi per porre fine alle sofferenze del popolo Tibetano attraverso negoziati pacifici e la riconciliazione hanno richiesto un enorme coraggio e sacrificio.”



Il
Premio Nobel per la Pace



La decisione del Comitato Norvegese per il Premio Nobel di assegnare il Premio Nobel per la Pace 1989 a Sua Santità il Dalai Lama è stata accolta in tutto il mondo, unica eccezione la Cina, con applausi e consensi. L’annuncio del Comitato così recita: “Il Comitato vuole sottolineare il fatto che il Dalai Lama, nella sua lotta per la liberazione del Tibet, si è continuamente opposto all’uso della violenza. Ha appoggiato invece soluzioni pacifiche basate sulla tolleranza e sul reciproco rispetto con l’obiettivo di conservare l’eredità storica e culturale del suo popolo. Il Dalai Lama ha sviluppato la sua filosofia di pace sulla base di un grande rispetto per tutti gli esseri viventi e sull’idea di responsabilità universale che abbraccia tutto il genere umano così come la natura. E’ opinione del Comitato che il Dalai Lama abbia formulato proposte costruttive e lungimiranti per la soluzione dei conflitti internazionali, del problema dei diritti umani e dei problemi ambientali mondiali”.
Il 10 Dicembre 1989, Sua Santità accettò il premio a nome di tutti gli oppressi, di tutti coloro che lottano per la libertà e la pace nel mondo e a nome del popolo tibetano. Nel suo commento disse: “Questo premio costituisce un’ulteriore conferma delle nostre convinzioni: usando come sole arma la verità, il coraggio e la determinazione, il Tibet sarà liberato. La nostra lotta deve rimanere non violenta e libera dall’odio.” In quell’occasione, lanciò anche un messaggio di incoraggiamento al movimento democratico guidato dagli studenti cinesi. “Nel giugno di quest’anno, in Cina, il movimento popolare democratico è stato schiacciato da una forza brutale. Ma non credo che le dimostrazioni siano state vane perché lo spirito di libertà si è riacceso nel popolo cinese e la Cina non può rimanere estranea allo spirito di libertà che si va diffondendo in molte parti del mondo. I coraggiosi studenti e i loro sostenitori hanno mostrato ai leader cinesi e al mondo il volto umano di una grande nazione.”


 




Un semplice monaco buddista



Sua Santità dice spesso: “Sono un semplice monaco buddista, niente di più e niente di meno.”
Conduce la stessa vita dei monaci buddisti. Vive in una piccola casa a Dharamsala, si alza alle 4 del mattino per meditare, prosegue con un ininterrotto programma di incontri amministrativi, udienze private, insegnamenti religiosi e cerimonie. Prima di ritirarsi, conclude la sua giornata con altre preghiere. Quando vuole spiegare quali sono le sue più importanti fonti di ispirazione, spesso cita i suoi versi preferiti, tratti dagli scritti di Shantideva, un celebre santo buddista dell’VIII° secolo:



Finché esisterà lo spazio
E finché vi saranno esseri viventi,
Fino ad allora possa io rimanere
Per scacciare la sofferenza dal mondo

Informazioni tratte dal sito ufficiale del governo tibetano in esilio

Consulta anche: Biografia su Italia Tibet